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Dr. Prudence Carter Visits Notre Dame

on Friday, 06 March 2020. Posted in Seminars, News

"From the Macro to the Micro: Boundaries and Educational (In)equality in Society and Schools"

On Friday, February 21, 2020, Dr. Prudence Carter, the Dean of Graduate School of Education at UC Berkeley, visited the Institute for Educational Initatives at Notre Dame to deliver a talk entitled, "From the Macro to the Micro: Boundaries and Educational (In)equality in Society and Schools". 

Photos courtesy of Kathleen Kennedy

About Dr. Prudence Carter

Prudence L. Carter is the E.H. and Mary E. Pardee Professor and Dean of the Graduate School of Education at Berkeley.  Dean Carter’s research focuses on factors that both shape and reduce economic, social and cultural inequalities among social groups in schools and society.  A sociologist, she examines academic and mobility differences influenced by the dynamics of race, ethnicity, poverty, class, and gender in U.S. and global society.  

Before being appointed Dean at Berkeley, she was the Jacks Family Professor of Education and Professor of Sociology (by courtesy) at Stanford University. She was also the Faculty Director of John W. Gardner Center for Youth and Their Communities, and the Director of the Research Institute for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity. Prior to joining the Stanford faculty in 2007, she was Associate Professor of Sociology at Harvard University.

A product of public schools in the Mississippi Delta, Dean Carter received a Bachelor of Science degree in applied mathematics and economics from Brown University; earned a Master of Art in Sociology and Education from Teachers College, Columbia University; and a Master of Philosophy and Ph.D. in Sociology from Columbia University.

Dean Carter’s award-winning book, Keepin’ It Real: School Success beyond Black and White (Oxford University Press, 2005), engages with and interrogates cultural explanations used to explain school achievement and racial identity for low-income Black and Latino youth in the United States. Keepin’ It Real was recognized as the 2006 co-winner of the Oliver Cromwell Cox Book Award given by the American Sociological Association (ASA) for its contribution to the eradication of racism; a 2005 finalist for the C. Wright Mills Book Award, given by the Society for the Study of Social Problems; and an Honorable Mention for best book given by the section on Race, Class, and Gender of the ASA.

Her other books include Stubborn Roots: Race, Culture, and Inequality in U.S. & South African Schools(link is external) (2012) and Closing the Opportunity Gap: What America Must Do to Give Every Child an Even Chance(link is external) (2013), co-edited with Dr. Kevin Welner — both published by Oxford University Press. Her other publications have appeared in various journals and book volumes. Her research has also been featured in the Peabody Award-winning documentary “Mind the Gap: Why Are Good Schools Failing Black Students” by journalist Nancy Solomon and has been featured on dozens of National Public Radio (NPR) shows across the United States.